Interview: Mark Weaver

Mark Weaver gestaltet faszinierende Bilder aus einem surrealen viktorianischen Zeitalter, in dem die Tiere Anzüge trugen: sepia- und pastellfarbene Abbilder einer anderen Welt.

The Past



My earliest memory is laying on the floor with paper and pencils drawing dinosaurs, sharks and other animals.

chameleonDiskursdisko: Hi Mark. To start things off, what’s your background? When did you start doing illustrations/artwork?

Mark Weaver: Well, I come from a family of artists – my father is a photographer, my mother and sister are musicians, both of my brothers are designers – so I grew up in an atmosphere where art was appreciated and encouraged.

Like most visual artists I started drawing very early on in my childhood. I drew constantly.

My earliest memory is laying on the floor with paper and pencils drawing dinosaurs, sharks and other animals.

The Art



I find various images from old books, online library archives, and a few other places. I’ll see something and immediately get an idea in my head and just go with it.

pantherDiskursdisko: How do you mainly produce your art? Which software do you use?

Mark Weaver:I mostly use Photoshop, Illustrator, some sort of writing utensil, and a scanner.

I like to piece things together and use them for a new purpose.

Diskursdisko: What inspires you?

Mark Weaver: Lots of stuff: typography, experimental music, taxidermy, old scientific illustrations, mid-century design, swiss design, architecture, tintype photos, antique etchings, my wife. 



Diskursdisko: Many of your recent pieces make me think of images in an imagined bestiary from a world where animals wear suits and uniforms – do you work with any kind of background story in mind?

Mark Weaver: I don’t have an exact story in mind when I am creating them, but they sort of take on a life of their own.

I try to imagine what the specific character would be like, what time period would they be from, what would they sound like if they could talk – things like that. 



Diskursdisko: Much of your art is based around the recontextualisation of old black & white images. where do you find these? How do you decide what to use?

Mark Weaver: I find various images from old books, online library archives, and a few other places. I’ll see something and immediately get an idea in my head and just go with it.



Diskursdisko: You have also done magazine layouts that are far more straightforward than your artwork – do you apply a different mindset to layout work?

Mark Weaver: Yes definitely. With editorial design you have to really consider what the mood of the piece is and what the writer is trying to convey. It’s more structured.


raconteurs

Four Images

The Web



This Make Something Cool Every Day project has been incredibly fun and rewarding. It’s what I look forward to every day.

wolf

Diskursdisko: You’ve obviously got the website at markweaverart.com, any other presences on the web you’d like to publicize? social networking?

Mark Weaver: There’s my flickr account and my behance account.

Diskursdisko: As you use the internet to showcase your art, are there any other websites you feel have influenced you, opened your mind or shown you new ways of creating art?

Mark Weaver: Two that I can think of right now are flickr and ffffound. Its inspiring to see some of the stuff people are doing.



Diskursdisko: Of all the work you’ve created, or at least the ones showcased on your website, can you name a couple that you have a special love for or connection to?

Mark Weaver: Yes, the Raconteurs piece I designed for Paste Magazine and most recently the wolfhead piece for the Make Something Cool Every Day (MSCED) project.

The Raconteurs aesthetic is similiar to mine so it was a blast to be able to work on that.

This MSCED project has been incredibly fun and rewarding. It’s what I look forward to every day.



The Future



pelican

Diskursdisko: Do you have any specific plans for the future direction of your artwork?

Mark Weaver: I plan to make a piece of artwork every day for the next year—maybe even longer than that. I started on January 6th and haven’t missed a day yet.

I don’t have a direction planned for my work. I like to be spontaneous.

Diskursdisko: Mark, many thanks for the interview – is there anything you’d like to add?

Mark Weaver: Thanks for the interview!






Vincent Wilkie hat diesen tollen Beitrag verfasst. In seiner Freizeit ist er Musiker, Webdesigner und DJ.

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