Interview: Matthew Curry

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Matthew Curry verbindet in seinen Arbeiten gekonnt Street Art, Comic-Style, Collagen und klassische Malerei. Daneben entwirft er Logos, ist als Produktdesigner tätig und wurde für zwei Thievery Corporation-Album-Cover für den Grammy nominiert.

The Past

I started moving beyond just the idea of making a picture and I began becoming engrossed with the conceptual side of things and exploring various iconography and materials.

2939856449_c57a6520df_ojpgDiskursdisko: Hi Matthew. To start things off, what’s your background? When did you start doing illustrations/artwork?

Matthew Curry: Growing up I was into comics and animation and I would always be drawing. I never really had any formal art training until I went to art school (Rhode Island School of Design).

It was here that I started getting into painting and design. I started moving beyond just the idea of making a picture and I began becoming engrossed with the conceptual side of things and exploring various iconography and materials. Being surrounded by so many talented people served as a catalyst to push myself into exploring different areas of the creative process.

The Art

It’s been my experience that inspiration is rarely found when I seek it out, but I have been really into quantum theory and the idea that everything is connected.

3274641215_c72d810a67_ojpgDiskursdisko: How do you mainly produce your art?

Matthew Curry: For my mixed media/ digital work I generally use a combination of hand drawn materials which I scan or photograph in conjunction with Photoshop and Illustrator on my Mac Power PC. Over the years I have developed a library of icons and marks that I treat as my own typeset or font collection. I use these to design my compositions. For my painting I  use whatever is available and enjoy the immediacy of materials that dry quickly, like acrylics, charcoal, tape, gels, charcoal, pens and collage.

Diskursdisko: What inspires you?

Matthew Curry: It’s been my experience that inspiration is rarely found when I seek it out, but I have been really into quantum theory and the idea that everything is connected. I also take a great deal of inspiration from music, film and literature.

Diskursdisko: Much of your artwork is in a collage/streetart style, combining comics, photoshop brushes and classic painting – how did you develop this style?

Matthew Curry: I think it all came about after years of playing with different stylistic and aesthetic approaches. Once i got pretty good at being able to perform these varying stylistic representations, I began to apply them into singular works. It was important for me to be able to juxtapose all these aesthetics into a cohesive fashion so that the work represented who I was and what my interests were.

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Diskursdisko: Can you tell us anything about the upcoming comic/animation project you’ve previewed on your flickr page?

Matthew Curry: I cannot go into the project too much right now but, It will be rolling out probably in the summer.

There is a vinyl sculpture designed by me involved, and the whole project is a limited run package for a band’s musical project.

Diskursdisko: When working for clients like magazines, how do you keep up the balance between clients’ wishes and concepts and your own need to produce art? Do you feel there actually is any difference between “commercial” artwork and other art?

Matthew Curry: When I’m doing work for clients it’s important to have the their best interest in mind. I need to convey their product or brand in a way that is smart, understandable and hopefully interesting. When doing work for myself the process is far less linear. I’m rarely setting out to make a final picture, and the process itself becomes the narrative, and the final piece is evidence of that relationship.

The Web

Commercially, I’d say my work for Thievery Corporation is the work that I  am most proud of.

Diskursdisko: You’ve obviously got the website at imagefed.com, any other presences on the web you’d like to publicize? Social networking?

Matthew Curry: I have had NinjaCruise.com since 1999 and that site has served as my online sketchbook where I experiment with multimedia and publish personal case studies. I’m working on MatthewCurry.net right now and that site will be my overall studio website that contains all my paintings and commissioned works from the past 12 years. Eventually, all my sites will point there because I’m doing much more fine art related projects as the years go on.

I don’t really twitter or facebook because I’m pretty busy :) I use my flickr to upload my works in progress and some of the latest things I’m working on just because I haven’t had much time these last couple of years to put together an updated portfolio. Soon though!

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Diskursdisko: As you use the internet to showcase your art, are there any other websites you feel have influenced you, opened your mind or shown you new ways of creating art?

Matthew Curry: I don’t really get too inspired by websites as much as I used to. Back in the day (late 90’s early 2000’s) there were quite a few that I would be blow away by (presstube still blows me away). My interests now are primarily based in analogue works so, I’ll check out gallery sites and go to museums when I have time.

There are just so many good things out on the web that I tend to get overwhelmed and distracted from my own work, so I have been taking a break from checking out portfolios and design portals.

Diskursdisko: Of all the work you’ve created, or at least the ones showcased on your website, can you name a couple that you have a special love for or connection to?

Matthew Curry: Commercially, I’d say my work for Thievery Corporation is the work that I  am most proud of. I collaborate with my friends and fellow designers, Neal Ashby and Patrick Donahue We have worked on 2 albums together for Thievery (Versions, Radio Retaliation) and they have both received GRAMMY® Nominations for their packaging.

As far as my more art-related works go, I’m pretty proud of the works I created for a show I did last autumn with painter, Robert Hardgrave at Limited Addiction Gallery in Denver. I’m into the works I’m creating now too.

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The Future

I just keep moving forward … I’m just constantly working in the studio trying to find those moments that shift my direction.

Diskursdisko: Do you have any specific plans for the future direction of your artwork?

Matthew Curry: I just keep moving forward. I’m doing a lot of gallery things over the next couple of years, so I’m just constantly working in the studio trying to find those moments that shift my direction.

Diskursdisko: Matthew, many thanks for the interview – is there anything you’d like to add?

Matthew Curry: Thanks for the interview!

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Vincent Wilkie hat diesen tollen Beitrag verfasst. In seiner Freizeit ist er Musiker, Webdesigner und DJ.

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